Routine Jobs

The following routine tasks will give you an idea of what you will need to think about doing at the various times if you keep chickens. These are my routine tasks:

Daily.

  • taking water to chickensFresh food and water needs to provided. Pelleted feeds can stay fresh for a week inside a hopper so that they are dispensed ad-lib as the hens require food, however it will soon go mouldy and cause disease if it is not kept dry. Place food containers under cover or purchase a rain hat to keep the rain off. Clean water containers with a small hand brush before refilling them with fresh water.
  • A quick 1 minute health check – stop for a minute and observe. Make sure everything appears normal.
  • Collect eggs and keep an eye out for broody hens over the spring and summer months.
  • Scatter a handful of corn per bird in the late afternoon as a treat.
  • Essential: Close the pop hole at night and open it in the morning to protect chickens from predators (especially foxes). Open the coop as soon as you are awake and it is light outside, close it at dusk as soon as your chickens have gone to roost for the night. An automatic doorkeeper has been one of the most useful items I have bought to lock up my chickens at dusk and let them out in the mornings. It is one of the more expensive items I have bought but it is very reliable (the batteries last well over a year) and I am not in a panic trying to get home as it gets dark and the best bit…. I get to have a little extra sleep in on the weekend!

Weekly.

  • Chicken houses should be cleaned out at least weekly to prevent a build up of organic matter, which puts your birds at more risk from respiratory problems and disease. Between May and October, check perch ends and cracks for Red Mite. They are very common and the sooner you find them, the easier it is to get rid of them.
  • Clean feed hoppers – a wipe will sometimes do.
  • Provide fresh greens at least twice a week, more often if chickens don’t have reasonable free range or if grass is short / there is snow on the ground.
  • Check grit hoppers and top up as necessary.
  • 5 minute check: Pick up a couple of birds and give them a quick health check.
  • Check your stocks and re-order as necessary.

Monthly

  • Give 2% Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV) in the water for one week a month. I always do this on the first week of every month so that I don’t forget.
  • Feed Verm-X monthly at 2.5g per bird.
MonthJobs to complete
JanuaryThink about breeding. 2 to 3 year old chickens are best for breeding as they have resistance to disease and their eggs are now a good size. Get incubators tested and ready for use if you plan on hatching this spring.
Add a vitamin supplement to the water if the weather is cold and rub vassalene into large combed cockerels such as Leghorns to protect against hard frosts. Provide regular greens when the ground is frozen. If snow falls, clear the ground immediately in front of their house so they can get out.
FebruaryOrder spare heat lamps for brooders, chick crumbs and anything else required if you are going to incubate.
Add a vitamin supplement to the water to birds that are breeding or if the weather is cold. Continue rubbing vaseline onto the combs of large combed cockerels if necessary.
Provide regular greens when the ground is frozen. Check fertility of eggs in incubator.
MarchCollect eggs and start incubating to get new stock.  Fertility should now be at its best and all hens should be laying by now. Add gravel, sand or wood chippings to well used ground as it turns to mud in the rain. Worm the flock with Flubenvet.
AprilSpring clean chicken houses. Set broody hens and tend to chicks if you have hatched them.
If you have a cockerel, fit poultry saddles to hens so they don’t lose feathers from their backs.
Build or buy any new housing required for new birds. Remember not to mix young chicks / growers with older birds but let them out on warmer days for a couple of hours around mid-day to get some fresh grass.
MayRed mite season begins – start preventative red mite treatment. Let chicks / growers out onto grass in covered runs and make sure they are locked up at night.
JuneContinue preventative red mite treatment.
Inspect fencing fully as June to September is a popular time for fox attacks. Make sure birds have shade and their water is not in the sunlight so they can cool themselves off by drinking.
JulyContinue preventative red mite treatment.
Get any painting or treating of houses done when the sun is shining. As chicks can be sexed, remove unwanted cockerels as they will cost you to keep and won’t be productive.
AugustContinue preventative red mite treatment.
As chickens come into moult, give them extra vitamins, a handful of dried catfood (for extra protein) and ACV to help them to grow new feathers.
SeptemberContinue preventative red mite treatment. Move this years hatch (now pullets) to their new accommodation or integrate them with the flock as they will soon start to lay. Worm the flock with Flubenvet. Repair houses and runs that need fixing before the winter. Replace sand or chippings if used in smaller runs.
OctoberRed Mite Season Ends – Stop preventative red mite treatment as weather turns cold. Review stock levels: Don’t over-winter stock that isn’t going to be of use next year. Remember young cockerels who get on fine now will become competitive and start to fight in the breeding season.
NovemberMake sure you have sufficient water containers for the freezing weather to come. Consider visiting some of the poultry shows that are held during the Autumn. Make sure hen houses are draft proof.
DecemberAdd a vitamin supplement to the water every other week if the weather is cold. Provide regular greens when the ground is frozen and extra corn so they have more fat (from the maize) to produce more heat. Ensure hens can get shelter when the weather is bad, especially in cold winds and rain.

 

The following routine tasks will give you an idea of what you will need to think about doing at the various times if you keep chickens. These are my routine tasks:

Daily.

·Fresh food and water needs to provided. Pelleted feeds can stay fresh for a week inside a hopper so that they are dispensed ad-lib as the hens require food. Clean water containers before refilling with a hand brush.

·Close the pop hole at night and open it in the morning to protect chickens from predators. An automatic doorkeeper has been one of the most useful items I have bought.

Weekly.

·Chicken houses should be cleaned out at least weekly to prevent a build up of organic matter, which puts your birds at more risk from respiratory problems and disease.

·Clean feed hoppers

·Provide fresh greens at least twice a week, more often if chickens don’t have reasonable free range.

Monthly

·Give 2% Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV) in the water for one week a month. I always do this on the first week of every month so that I don’t forget.

·Feed Verm-X monthly at 2.5g per bird.

Month

Job

January

Get incubators tested and ready for use if you plan on hatching this spring.

Add a vitamin supplement to the water if the weather is cold.

Provide regular greens when the ground is frozen.

February

Order spare heat lamps for brooders, chick crumbs and anything else required if you are going to incubate.

Add a vitamin supplement to the water to birds that are breeding or if the weather is cold.

Provide regular greens when the ground is frozen.

March

Start incubating to get new stock.

Worm the flock with Flubenvet.

April

Spring clean chicken houses

If you have a cockerel, fit poultry saddles to hens so they don’t lose feathers from their backs.

Build or buy any new housing required for new birds. Remember not to mix young chicks / growers with older birds.

May

Red Mite Season begins – start preventative red mite treatment.

June

Continue preventative red mite treatment

July

Continue preventative red mite treatment

August

Continue preventative red mite treatment

As chickens come into moult, give them extra vitamins and ACV to help them to grow new feathers.

September

Continue preventative red mite treatment

Worm the flock with Flubenvet.

Repair houses and runs that need fixing before the winter.

Replace sand or chippings if used in smaller runs.

October

Red Mite Season Ends – Stop preventative red mite treatment as weather turns cold.

Review stock levels: Don’t over-winter stock that isn’t going to be of use next year. Remember young cockerels who get on fine now will become competitive and start to fight in the breeding season.

November

Make sure you have sufficient water containers for the freezing weather to come.

December

Add a vitamin supplement to the water if the weather is cold.

Provide regular greens when the ground is frozen.

If you like this page please share it to help others find it.

Do you have any routine jobs I have missed from this list? Please leave me a comment below.

32 Responses to Routine Jobs

  1. sarah says:

    hi im getting six chickens they are having a very nice coop and run , when i get them am i best to keep them in for a day then let them out to get use to there new home

    • Keeping Chickens says:

      Yes, you can keep them in but often, I find you can let them out if they are securely fenced in a pen and put them in for a couple of nights if they don’t find their way in themselves and then they soon get the message.

  2. bantamlover says:

    Thank you – what a great website! This has really helped me. Will save this page to help me when i need it!!

    Thanks again

    :)

  3. MEG MACDONALD says:

    My three light sussex girls seem content and lay well. One of them is very dirty round her rear end. Can I put a water tray in the run, do hens paddle? Does she need help to clean herself? Any help very welcome. Thanks

    • Keeping Chickens says:

      No, she will only drink for it. Chickens will take a dust bath but not get wet. What you can do though is wash her yourself. Stand her I warm water and use baby shampoo. Make sure she is fully dry when you finish. Use a towel and then a hair drier. They are usually quite calm and don’t seem to mind this. This is after all how chickens are prepared for a show.

  4. Alison Clewes says:

    Hi

    I have had my six chickens for a week. It took a few days to get them used to going to bed but the past couple of nights they go to bed at 21:25 and I go and shut them in.

    The problem is I would like them to go in earlier as by the time they go in it is past twilight and Charlie Fox is creeping about the field. They are surrounded by an electric fence but I don’t for minute think this is a fail safe for them!

    How can I encourage them in by 20:00 when its not quite dimpsy? It also means I’m not waiting to go to bed because they haven’t. I let them out by 06:30, and leave their feeder down all day til about 19:30 when I pick it up and give them a few handfuls of corn. They like the corn but they don’t go to bed!

    Any advice greatly appreciated.

    • Keeping Chickens says:

      You could try scattering some corn or treats in their house to see if they will go in for those?

  5. Amy says:

    Hi
    What plants complement chickens? I know they will get pecked at but would be of benefit to chickens
    Thanks

    • Keeping Chickens says:

      Most greens are eaten but the most beneficial is actually grass and the insects that they find in grass.

      Grass can make up a significant amount of their protein intake when it is fresh and growing in spring.

  6. Tim Morgan says:

    Thank you millions for a wonderful website. I am about to build my first chicken coop and enclosure. My uncle had almost 100 chickens when I was about 6, and I tended them regularly. I’ve wanted to keep my own since, (40+ years) and have finally got the opportunity. Your website has given me so much valuable ‘starter advice’ that I feel confident enough to become a keeper and possibly, a breeder. What a wonderful site. ;-)))

    • Keeping Chickens says:

      Thank you. I appreciate your comments. Please share the site for me, I don’t have a Facebook page but likes, tweets and mentions around the forums are so valuable to me because they bring in a few more visitors :-)

  7. Gill & James says:

    We are picking up our 3 chickens in the next week or so and this is the best website I’ve found to help us as complete novices! Such sensible and detailed advice – it is wonderful! I’m sure I’ll be a regular visitor :)

    • Keeping Chickens says:

      Thank you. Please do me a favour and like / share it if you do the social thing – I don’t have Facebook (no time!) but get a steady trickle of visitors from Facebook :-)

  8. Loretta says:

    yes a big thanks from us too. We have just been given 4 hens and a cockerel, along with a very large house ( for the hens not for us ! ). we are absolute novises so all your info is welcome. we got them on Sat. morning and they gave us an egg that morning – we ate it in true ‘Good Life ‘ fashion with pomp and ceremony and some fresh bread. You’re right the flavour is sooo much better than shop bought. Cheers Loretta

  9. tony duffield says:

    i find this website very handy as I have rescued 4 chickens from a motorway accident they are all eating and drinking and 2 are walking round but the other 2 seen to have a problem with there legs cant feel anything broken but could they be badly bruised thanks

  10. carol says:

    Loving your site for info. Thank you.
    I have 2 lots of 3 chickens and want to put them together, petrified of doing it though as a few of them are quite bossy! new to all this. Done my research but never kept my own flock.
    Fab info on here

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